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Showing posts from April, 2010

Basic Guide to Recording audiovisual teaching materials

Jisc have just published a new advice document: Basic Guide to Videoing Audiovisual Materials.The guide is intended for users who wish to record teaching materials such as those used during a lecture. This includes both projected materials, materials shown on a television screen and printed materials. It covers everything the novice should need to know from the first step to the last.
Jisc have just published a new advice document: Basic Guide to Videoing Audiovisual Materials.The guide is intended for users who wish to record teaching materials such as those used during a lecture. This includes both projected materials, materials shown on a television screen and printed materials. It covers everything the novice should need to know from the first step to the last.

Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) supports United Kingdom post-16 and higher education and research by providing leadership in the use of ICT (Information and Communications Technology) in support of learning, teachi…

New Jiscmail Site

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Doesn't sound very exciting, does it? However, it's a REALLY nice looking, well designed and easy to use site - top marks!
The National Academic Mailing List Service, known as 'JISCMail', is a service designed specifically for the further and higher education and research communities and is one of a number of services provided by JISC Advance therefore making it (according to Jisc) "the foremost strategic collaboration tool within the academic community."

JISCMail uses the world wide web and e-mail to enable groups of academics and support staff to talk to each other and to share information. There are thousands of groups covering many categories. If you are unable to find a group on your chosen subject and you can satisfy the JISC criteria, you may start a group of your own.
The site, www.jiscmail.ac.uk, was designed to be easier to navigate, taking into account all relevant feedback from JISC customers, and it certainly looks intuitive at first use.

To blog or not to blog: Student perceptions of blog effectiveness for learning

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A nice study by Olivia Halic, Debra Lee, Trena Paulus and Marsha Spence looked at whether the use of blogs in a large lecture class would enhance students' perceived learning - interesting findings: "While a majority of the students reported that blogging enhanced their learning and led them to think about course concepts outside the classroom, fewer perceived value in peer comments."

Full Study: To blog or not to blog: Student perceptions of blog effectiveness for learning in a college-level course