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Showing posts from October, 2010

Death in Rome

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"Be a Roman sleuth - use your detective skills to unravel the events behind a mysterious death. You have until dawn to investigate the crime scene, and crack the case."

Honestly, what's not to like! This is a really nice interactive history experience from the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk//history/ancient/romans/launch_gms_deathrome.shtml

iLearn Technology suggest ways in which the game might be integrated into your teaching: "Death in Rome is a fantastic exercise in critical thinking, reasoning, and deduction.  Students will learn about ancient Rome, using clues to solve a mystery, and find out how engaging and interesting history can be.  Death in Rome would make a great partner activity.  Students can work together in teams to solve the crime.  When each team has cracked the case, they can share the strategy they used and the clues that tipped them off to the solution.  If you don’t have access to a lab setting, solve the case as a class using a projector or interacti…

Latin facilius percipit

Si contendunt latin texts litteris ergo hoc tibi solutio - Google translate nunc iuvo vos adepto utique Summa, Vol. Magna!

Translate it here: http://translate.google.com/?sl=la&tl=en#la|en

What research has to say for practice

Following on from JISC's daily pinta elearning, this set of guides from ALT is pretty spectacular, I have to say - a really good evidence-based introduction to many important areas of learning with technology. There are ten guides in all, as follows:
a) Tutoring on-line – Gilly Salmon and Mike Keppell
b) Web-based course design – Robin Mason and Frank Rennie
c) Learner acceptance of on-line learning and e-learning – Allison Littlejohn and Brian Whalley
d) Learning objects and repositories – Allison Littlejohn and John Cook
e) Learning using mobile and hand-held devices – Mike Sharples and Agnes Kukuluska-Hulme
f) On-line communities – Frank Rennie and Mike Keppell
g) Technology-supported assessment – David Nicol
h) Learning environments – Bob Banks and Gilly Salmon
i) Using social software in learning – Frances Bell and Frank Rennie
j) New Literacies – Doug Belshaw
Here's the landing page: http://wiki.alt.ac.uk/index.php/What_research_has_to_say_for_practice