Time to study

This post is a bit belated - posted here from my previous blog and really dated June 5th, but it's actually really useful to re-read it in order to keep the lessons here in sight.

Well... an even better day! Planning and time-keeping is all! So, I had planned for a day of reading today - having pruned the unnecessary books, I also identified which chapters to read in each of the ones left behind after the rapture and made a start. However, whilst out walking the dog this morning, I realised that when I set aside 'a day' for doctoral research, that day feels somewhat unbounded, a desert of time to drag myself across, thirsty by the end and knackered - so I had the neat idea of setting limits and working to it.So, I had planned for a day of reading today - having pruned the unnecessary books, I also identified which chapters to read in each of the ones left behind after the rapture and made a start. However, whilst out walking the dog this morning, I realised that when I set aside 'a day' for doctoral research, that day feels somewhat unbounded, a desert of time to drag myself across, thirsty by the end and knackered - so I had the neat idea of setting limits and working to it.

This is how it works. I will now state that a day of study will be 6 hours - which is not bad, given that I need to function in other ways, eating, playing guitar, walking the dog, hedonism, rest etc. I think that this system may also be more manageable during the working week, if I try and aim initially at 2 hours of study per working day. It doesn't matter when this is done - early morning, lunch hour,
evening - and it can be done in separate pieces as long as it finally amounts to the total. Anyway, my phone has a count-down timer on it, which I set as follows:

A full day of study = 6 hours

Small chunks of study = 2 hours

Thus, at all points, an end is in sight. As you can see, I'm nearly at the half-way mark for today, so I shall go out for a nice walk and finish off later...

 

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